Magic Letters; The Keys to the World of Words (Catch a Reading Bug!)

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You can manage your subscription and turn off auto-renewal in your iTunes Account Settings after purchase. No cancellation is allowed during active subscription period. As a sophomore in high school, I find this app incredibly useful in keeping track of my assignments and preventing late work. Personally, I find the color coding feature really convenient since it lets me easily see what needs to get done. I also know that many students myself included are involved in extracurricular activities, and having that category added on in addition to classes would also help.

Keep up the awesome work. If you need any further assistance, please send as an email at hello thehomeworkapp. I started my junior year of high school with so much homework that I began finding hard to keep track of. Never did I use a planning app before, but out of all the ones I saw, this is the best!

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However, my favorite feature is the priority rating option they give you. However, if there are two suggestions I could make it would be 1. I love this app. One time, I had an essay to do and put it down, but then it was the next morning and I realized I had an essay for homework. Thanks for reading and if this is the owner of the app, please fix this so I can go back to using this app.

Thanks -Alexis. Requires iOS Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. App Store Preview. This app is only available on the App Store for iOS devices. Screenshots iPhone iPad. This darkly funny early chapter book will be a favorite of any teacher, librarian, or parent who has ever tried to reach a child who dislikes reading, and the fast moving plot, believable voice, humor, and mild scariness will appeal to many reluctant readers.

It's a perfect short read-aloud for a younger child who has developed an attention span for longer stories than those found in picture books, and the first book that, between the action-packed story and evocative illustrations, actually created a physical reaction in my son- he ran around with his tongue sticking out, demanding a straw, for at least an hour, and begged to hear the story again. If you can find a copy, The Ink Drinker is a must have for any library collection and nearly any reader.

Highly recommended for all libraries.

The Fox River flows for miles through Wisconsin and Illinois, and when Donna Latham announced that she was writing and collecting ghost stories from the surrounding towns, area residents reached out to share their tales. Others, like "Another Cup for Willa", about a woman who is visited by the ghostly presence of a dead friend on her birthday, are personal recollections. Often the two seem to overlap. The first story, "The Train Track Ghosts" is one of these.

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The storyteller's voice is so vivid that you can almost see him sitting on the author's porch, but underneath the trappings of the tale he tells is a recognizable urban legend. The quality of the stories vary. Others feel awkward- although the plotting is good, the author frequently uses complex vocabulary, and her attempts at dialogue and writing in dialect often seem forced. Latham also chose to illustrate her book with a strange and cluttered collection of clip art, which is distracting and interrupts the flow of her stories.

However, she does a good job of fitting in local history and background without overwhelming the narrative, a difficult thing to do, and does a nice job at establishing the setting for her stories, so she accomplishes what she set out to do rather well. While Ghosts of the Fox River Valley is an interesting read, there isn't enough new material here to recommend it for all libraries.

However, public and school libraries and local history buffs in the area Latham describes in her book ought to take a look. In particular, school libraries and upper elementary or middle school teachers may want to consider it in connection with teaching to social studies standards that focus on local history and language arts standards focused on speaking, listening, and writing, as Ghosts of the Fox River Valley is a good resource for beginning an oral history project.

Beyond possible uses in the classroom, the same kids who love Alvin Schwartz's Scary Stories books will love having ghost stories set in their area available to them. Recommended to public and school libraries and local history collections in the area of the Fox River Valley. The Nose by Nikolai Gogol , ill.

It's not just any nose, either, it is the nose of one of his customers, a self-important bureaucrat named Kovaliov. Terrified to leave the nose where it can be connected to him, Yankelovich sets off to hide it, but his furtive behavior attracts official attention. In the meantime, Kovaliov wakes up to discover he has no nose. Covering his face with a handkerchief, he starts down the street, where he spots his nose, dressed as a fine gentleman and high official. Kovaliov hesitates to approach a social superior, even a former appendage, but he wants his nose back and confronts the nose, who denies any connection with him.

Eventually a police officer returns the nose confiscated from Yankelovich, but it won't stick to Kovaliov's face! Kovaliov is unable to show his face in public without ridicule, shutting down his social ambitions, as the nose-posing-as-officer has become a sensation. Then one day Kovaliov wakes up to find the nose back on his face, firmly attached.

Anyone looking for logic or narrative structure in The Nose will be disappointed. The pieces don't fit together neatly It is nightmarish in some ways- finding a nose in his breakfast must have been pretty stomach-churning for Yankelovich, and when he abruptly disappears from the story the imagination finds ominous ways to fill in the blanks. Gogol is an important figure in Russian literature, with a talent for the surreal who wrote in a different time and a different context, and he wasn't writing for children. The setting, names, and characters may seem alien to many children, the vocabulary is advanced, and the social satire will probably fly over kids' heads.

But when it comes down to it, this is one giant, horrifying, absurd joke about a nose, and kids definitely get that.


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Reading it out loud, it is almost impossible not to at least giggle. Gennadij Spirin's illustrations will make certain that kids get the joke. Many pages are framed with incredibly detailed drawings of St. Petersburg, Russia, the setting of the story, and observant readers will spot the bizarre giant nose in its plumed hat traveling the streets in its elaborate horse-drawn carriage.

Everything in the full page illustrations seems slightly exaggerated, so the most absurd elements aren't jarring, and readers won't even realize how far they are suspending disbelief until they are well into the story.

By Louisa May Alcott

Spirin's representations of the nose are amazing. Some of them seem very cartoony, but in full uniform, the nose does appear to be its own person, so to speak. And, in fact, this book has been used to teach upper elementary students about personification and figurative language. Although it's a picture book, very young children won't be ready for it, but elementary and middle students may enjoy it, especially with some guidance.

It's also a good choice for older students looking for a nonthreatening introduction to Russian literature, and readers of any age who like a touch of the bizarre. Jeff Szpriglas has created a guide to fear. Phobias, superstitions, killer animals, monsters, cryptids, scary movies and more- Szpirglas examines them all in Fear This Book.

The book is much more than a list of fears, though. The author also explains the physiological and psychological reactions to fright, and details experiments and therapies that have been used to understand fear. Silver Dragon Codex by R. Mirrorstone, Jace, the young high wire acrobat must help Belen, a beautiful dancer, acquit herself of the charges being brought by a white robed mage from Palanthas. Surely the beautiful young girl cannot actually be a silver dragon in disguise Jace, Belen, and a few others from the circus head off to determine the truth behind the story.

Along the way they are confronted by werewolves and a chimera, and the truth turns out to be far more complicated than it first seemed.

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I say this is the weakest entry so far because the other stories in the series are well thought out and all of the varying story lines are wrapped up neatly by the end of each book. I find this to be important in a YA novel. The Silver Dragon Codex leaves many things unexplained, and also suffers from problems with continuity and weak writing. I also found this book to be a bit darker than the others, and for some reason it came across a bit dull. Perhaps it is because the characters are less likable than the ones in previous novels, or perhaps the problem is the overly complicated plot.

Although this is an okay book, and readers following the series may want to try it, it is nowhere near as good as previous books in the series. Contains: Fantasy Violence without gore. R eview by KDP. The Gates by John Connolly. Poor little Samuel is not having a good time. His parents have recently split up, he's very smart but tends to annoy or creep out most adults, and he perplexes most of the kids his age.

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He decides to go trick-or-treating 3 days early in order to show initiative and he and his little four legged pal Bosworth stumble across the beginning of the end - a bored uppity couple and their equally bored friends. When boredom overtakes the Abernathys they decide to give the dark arts a try - mix in a few scientists who are trying to create an artificial black hole a few countries away and you have the opening to the gates of hell. It may sound a bit far-fetched or over the top, but readers will find themselves engrossed by sweet little Samuel and his wonderful dog.


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Not to mention the demons who are having a harder time at this taking over the world thing then they expected - I mean no one ever tells demons to look both ways before crossing the street. I laughed, I smiled, I enjoyed this book from beginning to end. But at the same time I really felt that this was a novel for adults, thinking back on their pre-teen years.

With a splendid use of the English language and a dry but light sense of humor, the author has written a fun book that many will enjoy. Review by KDP. The Composer is Dead is a pretty sophisticated picture book. The humor, vocabulary, and need for context are not simple at all. My four year old, who is in the target audience for picture books, loves music, and always wants me to identify the individual instruments in orchestral music, was totally baffled by the story.